Know The Difference Between Cold And Swine Flu Symptoms

Symptom
Cold
Swine Flu
Fever
Fever is rare with a cold. Fever is usually present with the flu in up to 80% of all flu cases. A temperature of 100°F or higher for 3 to 4 days is associated with the flu.
Coughing
A hacking, productive (mucus- producing) cough is often present with a cold. A non-productive (non-mucus producing) cough is usually present with the flu (sometimes referred to as dry cough).
Aches
Slight body aches and pains can be part of a cold. Severe aches and pains are common with the flu.
Stuffy Nose
Stuffy nose is commonly present with a cold and typically resolves spontaneously within a week. Stuffy nose is not commonly present with the flu.
Chills
Chills are uncommon with a cold. 60% of people who have the flu experience chills.
Tiredness
Tiredness is fairly mild with a cold. Tiredness is moderate to severe with the flu.
Sneezing
Sneezing is commonly present with a cold. Sneezing is not common with the flu.
Sudden Symptoms
Cold symptoms tend to develop over a few days. The flu has a rapid onset within 3-6 hours. The flu hits hard and includes sudden symptoms like high fever, aches and pains.
Headache
A headache is fairly uncommon with a cold. A headache is very common with the flu, present in 80% of flu cases.
Sore Throat
Sore throat is commonly present with a cold. Sore throat is not commonly present with the flu.
Chest Discomfort
Chest discomfort is mild to moderate with a cold. Chest discomfort is often severe with the flu.
Advertisements

Here is the Precautions to help fight against H1N1.

The only portals of entry are the nostrils and mouth/throat. In a global epidemic of this nature, it’s almost impossible not coming into contact with H1N1 in spite of all precautions. Contact with H1N1 is not so much of a problem as proliferation is.

While you are still healthy and not showing any symptoms of H1N1 infection, in order to prevent proliferation, aggravation of symptoms and development of secondary infections, some very simple steps, not fully highlighted in most official communications, can be practiced (instead of focusing on how to stock N95 or Tamiflu):

1. Frequent hand-washing (well highlighted in all official communications).

2. “Hands-off-the-face” approach. Resist all temptations to touch any part of face (unless you want to eat, bathe or slap).

3. *Gargle twice a day with warm salt water (use Listerine if you don’t trust salt). *H1N1 takes 2-3 days after initial infection in the throat/nasal cavity to proliferate and show characteristic symptoms. Simple gargling prevents proliferation. In a way, gargling with salt water has the same effect on a healthy individual that Tamiflu has on an infected one. Don’t underestimate this simple, inexpensive and powerful preventative method.

4. Similar to 3 above, *clean your nostrils at least once every day with warm salt water. *Not everybody may be good at using a Neti pot, but *blowing the nose hard once a day and swabbing both nostrils with cotton swabs dipped in warm salt water is very effective in bringing down viral population.*

5. *Boost your natural immunity with foods that are rich in Vitamin C. *If you have to supplement with Vitamin C tablets, make sure that it also has Zinc to boost absorption.

6. *Drink as much of warm liquids (tea, coffee, etc) as you can. *Drinking warm liquids has the same effect as gargling, but in the reverse direction. They wash off proliferating viruses from the throat into the stomach where they cannot survive, proliferate or do any harm.

I suggest you pass this on to your entire e-list; you never know who might pay attention to it – and STAY ALIVE because of it –

Here is a fabulous list of ten reasons to support locally owned shops and buy locally made products. Since we at OTTB are both locally owned and comprised of mostly locally made products, we wanted to pass on our reasons behind our local commitment!

copied from the website: http://sustainableconnections.org/thinklocal/why

Why Buy Locally Owned?

There are many well-documented benefits to our communities and to each of us to choosing local, independently owned businesses. We realize it is not always possible to buy what you need locally and so merely ask you to Think Local FIRST!

Top Ten reasons to Think Local – Buy Local – Be Local

  1. Buy Local — Support yourself: Several studies have shown that when you buy from an independent, locally owned business, rather than a nationally owned businesses, significantly more of your money is used to make purchases from other local businesses, service providers and farms — continuing to strengthen the economic base of the community.(Click here to see summaries of a variety of economic impact studies; these include case studies showing that locally-owned businesses generate a premium in enhanced economic impact to the community and our tax base.)
  2. Support community groups: Non-profit organizations receive an average 250% more support from smaller business owners than they do from large businesses.
  3. Keep our community unique: Where we shop, where we eat and have fun — all of it makes our community home. Our one-of-a-kind businesses are an integral part of the distinctive character of this place. Our tourism businesses also benefit. “When people go on vacation they generally seek out destinations that offer them the sense of being someplace, not just anyplace.” ~ Richard Moe, President, National Historic Preservation Trust
  4. Reduce environmental impact: Locally owned businesses can make more local purchases requiring less transportation and generally set up shop in town or city centers as opposed to developing on the fringe. This generally means contributing less to sprawl, congestion, habitat loss and pollution.
  5. Create more good jobs: Small local businesses are the largest employer nationally and in our community, provide the most jobs to residents.
  6. Get better service: Local businesses often hire people with a better understanding of the products they are selling and take more time to get to know customers.
  7. Invest in community: Local businesses are owned by people who live in this community, are less likely to leave, and are more invested in the community’s future.
  8. Put your taxes to good use: Local businesses in town centers require comparatively little infrastructure investment and make more efficient use of public services as compared to nationally owned stores entering the community.
  9. Buy what you want, not what someone wants you to buy: A marketplace of tens of thousands of small businesses is the best way to ensure innovation and low prices over the long-term. A multitude of small businesses, each selecting products based not on a national sales plan but on their own interests and the needs of their local customers, guarantees a much broader range of product choices.
  10. Encourage local prosperity: A growing body of economic research shows that in an increasingly homogenized world, entrepreneurs and skilled workers are more likely to invest and settle in communities that preserve their one-of-a-kind businesses and distinctive character.

Think local first + Buy local when you can = Being a local!

_uacct = “UA-2265239-1”; urchinTracker();

Here is an interesting article on the swine flu and upcoming vaccine. At the bottom of the article are more sources.

Do NOT Let Your Child Get Flu Vaccine — 9 Reasons Why

NEW YORK — Johnson & Johnson’s McNeil unit said Thursday it is voluntarily recalling 57 lots of infants’ and children’s liquid Tylenol products because of possible bacterial contamination.

The products being recalled were made between April and June and include nearly two dozen varieties, including Children’s Tylenol Suspension 4 oz. Grape, Infants’ Tylenol Grape Suspension Drops 1/4 oz. and Children’s Tylenol Plus Cold/Allergy 4 oz. Bubble Gum.

Johnson & Johnson said it has contacted wholesalers and retailers about the recall. An inactive ingredient didn’t meet internal testing requirements, the company said, and B. cepacia bacteria were detected in a portion of raw material that went unused in the finished product.

The company said in a letter that no bacteria were found in the finished product, and that the likelihood of a serious medical event is remote. However, in consultation with the Food and Drug Administration, the company decided to recall the products.

“It was decided, as a precaution, to recall all product that utilized any of the raw material manufactured at the same time as the raw material that tested positive for the bacteria,” the company said.

Consumers with questions should call McNeil’s consumer call center at 1-800-962-5357. A full list of the 21 recalled products and their lot numbers can be seen at: http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tylenol.com%2Fpage.jhtml%3Fidtylenol%2Fnews%2Fsubpchildinfantnews.inc&h=a456a4f5ba1b6aade9ac173f14ccaa8a

Consumers can find lot numbers on the bottom of the product’s box and on the sticker that surrounds the product’s bottle.

Now you can help your friends and family members by sharing a new resource that has just been released this week: Healthy Stuff tested 5,000 products for unhealthy chemicals, and created a handy searchable database so consumers can access the results.

We’re sending this link to everyone we know because none of us want hazardous chemicals in our homes. Feel free to forward this email far and wide to friends and family so they can access this information too.

Here are some highlights from Healthy Stuff tests on products families use every day:

Women’s Handbags
HealthyStuff.org tested over 100 handbags and found lead in over 75% of the bags they analyzed. We worked hard to get lead out of children’s toys— but both of my kids still enjoy playing dress up with my old purses. Find Out More.

Car Seats and Booster Seats
We all know boosters and car seats save lives, and using them is a MUST. But over half (58%) of car seats tested by Healthy Stuff contain hazardous chemicals, including PVC, BFRs and heavy metals. Car Seats can be made without these chemicals – the Baby Trend Flex-Loc; the Graco Nautilus 3-in-1 Car Seat; and the Graco Turbo Booster all passed the test with flying colors. You can research your child’s carseat or booster in the Healthy Stuff database .

Cars and Minivans
Chemical levels found in cars can be 5-10 times higher than in homes or offices. For moms, dads, and kids who log hours in carpool duty every week, this can be a major source of toxic chemical exposure. HealthyStuff.org tested nearly 700 new and used vehicles for dangerous chemicals. The U.S. made Pontiac G5 and Chevy Cobalt rated best among 2009 vehicles. Look up your vehicle here.

Pet Products
Since there are no government standards for hazardous chemicals in pet products, it is not surprising that alarming levels of toxic chemicals were found in beds, chew toys, collars and leashes. One quarter of all pet products tested had detectable levels of lead. Check out how your pooch’s favorite plaything tested.
As parents, grandparents, and allies, we can all work together and use our power as consumers to demand healthier products and improved safety standards. The positive feedback from the safe school supplies guide we sent around last month was overwhelming. It turns out (surprise, surprise!) people want to know if the products they buy are exposing them to toxic chemicals that are associated with health issues including fertility problems and miscarriage, learning and developmental disabilities, and a wide range of cancers and other diseases. 1
Clearly with such a long list of products that contain toxic chemicals, the nation’s chemicals policy needs to be reformed so that known-dangerous chemicals will not be found in the products we buy everyday for our families.2 While we’re distributing information about toxic chemicals in commonly used products, we’re also working to reform the nation’s chemical policies so we don’t put our children at risk. Stay tuned.


We all know what family friendly means to us… basically an environment I can take my two year old and find something for him to eat, possibly with the added benefit of comfortable seating. Wouldn’t it be nice if the term really meant what it set out to! Redefining family friendly is an initiative of mine that I hope we can all join in. I want to walk into a “family friendly” establishment to see employees with babies in baby carriers on their backs, going about their work with the support of their coworkers and customers. I want to patronize a place where if my two year old breaks down, someone comes up and plays with him or offers to hold him or reacts in some productive way instead of rolling their eyes or refusing eye contact! We are striving to create such an example in our little shop and encourage others to take a similar initiative in their businesses. We would also love to have input on how we can better achieve our mission… please always feel free to email us at ontheturtlesback@gmail.com.


Check out this fabulous story about a VBAC after 3 cesareans… unassisted on the side of the highway! A very inspirational story about the power of birth!
How about on the Interstate?

A call to action forwarded by a friend:
“Regardless of your feelings on health care reform, you should support the addition of CPM’s as enrolled care providers. We could save the system billions in the long run and to deny CPM care to medicaid moms is discrimination. Please sign and forward to your friends.”


(great idea Brian!)
Many of you have heard that plastics can be harmful to babies (and parents too!)… but why?
Some plastics (particularly relevant clear plastics used in baby bottles, among other things) have been found to release a harmful chemical called Bisphenol A (or BPA). BPA is an environmental estrogen and thus can cause hormone disruption, something that can be harmful to anyone but is particularly disruptive in the developing system of a young child. BPA can be released regardless of the age or number of washings of a container. The warmer the temperature of the container, the more BPA is released. In reaction, many bottle companies are using new, BPA-free plastics and many retailers are refusing to sell products containing BPA. Many parents are also looking into plastic free feeding options, like glass bottles or stainless steel containers like the Safe Sippy that we carry at On the Turtle’s Back.

Let us come to you!
On The Turtle's Back e-mail subscriptions. We don't do anything creepy or spammy with your e-mail address (because we hate that, too).

Join 9 other followers

Follow us on Twitter!

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.